Do I Look Fat in This?

Life Doesn't Begin Five Pounds from Now

Do I Look Fat in This?

For any woman who has bonded with a stranger by complaining about how fat she feels, here is a thoughtful and inspiring guide to breaking the cycle of body criticism and creating a powerful and healthy self-image.

Let's face it, you're tired of dieting. You hate counting calories and carbs and fat grams. You're sick of the pressure to work out three times a week. Bottom line: You're tired of feeling fat.

But here's the thing: Fat is not a feeling. Happy, angry, sad -- those are feelings. When you say you feel fat, chances are you mean something else. And when you ask someone if you look fat, you're probably asking, "Am I good enough?"

Whether you're a size 2, 12, or 22, it's considered normal to hate your body. Society practically encourages it. But this discontent is really just a way of masking deeper issues such as insecurity, low self-esteem, or a longing for love and acceptance. By focusing on what others tell you are your shortcomings, you miss countless opportunities to feel connected, sexy, and powerful.

Do I Look Fat in This? brings good news: Life doesn't begin five pounds from now. In this book, acclaimed author and speaker Jessica Weiner provides real solutions to real problems, from surviving a closet meltdown when you can't find anything to wear, to how to cope with being bombarded by images of perfect-looking models.

With quizzes, guides, tools, and tips, Do I Look Fat in This? offers a step-by-step plan for creating a more fulfilling and positive life. You'll feel better about your job, your relationship, your family, your friends -- and most important, yourself.
  • Gallery Books | 
  • 208 pages | 
  • ISBN 9781416940487 | 
  • December 2005


Jessica Weiner: Do I Look Fat in This?

Jessica Weiner offers solutions for breaking the cycle of body criticism and creating a powerful and healthy self-image.

Reading Group Guide

Questions and Topics for Discussion about Life Doesn't Begin 5 Pounds from Now

1. How do you speak about your body around your family? How do you think it makes them feel? What kind of advice does the author give to you regarding talking and dealing with family members about weight/body issues?
2. The author talks about different ways to incorporate the people in your life and to make them an active part of your life plan. Have you ever gone on a diet with a family member? What was the experience like?
3. Think back to a time in your life when you had a major life accomplishment that was weight related. How can you use this accomplishment to attain further goals?
4. Review the "ten typical responses" box on pp. 32 -- 33 in Chapter 2. How do you usually respond to the question, "Do I look fat in this?" Practice the transitions on pp.34 -- 35. What are ways in which you can put these transitions into action?
5. What has the author said about today's media? How has it affected the overall culture of self-esteem?
6. How do you think women can navigate through all of the conflicting messages that they get from the media? Should they go on a "media diet"? What other tools or techniques can they use be a part of pop culture but not brainwashed by pop culture?
7. What is your initial reaction to the word fat? What are ways in which you can improve on your notions of the word, and how can you help people understand what k see more

About the Author

Jessica Weiner
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Jessica Weiner

Considered this generation’s “go-to authority” on women, girls, and confidence, Jess Weiner believes that if we want to change the culture, we have to work together with the media makers, marketers, and influencers who create the messaging. She is a social entrepreneur and the CEO of Talk to Jess, a consulting and strategy firm that advises brands about the issues facing today’s women and girls. Jess has over twenty years of experience working in the field as a speaker, writer, and educator. She’s authored two bestselling books and has proudly served as the Global Self-Esteem Ambassador for Dove for almost a decade. Currently, she’s an adjunct professor at USC’s Annenberg School of Journalism teaching personal branding and entrepreneurship. Jess was recently named by Forbes as one of the “14 Power Women to Follow” on Twitter. Learn more at