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A Druid's Herbal of Sacred Tree Medicine

A Druid's Herbal of Sacred Tree Medicine

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An in-depth look at the history, herbal uses, and spiritual aspects of the sacred trees in the ancient Celtic Ogham Tree Alphabet

• Details the 20 trees of the ogham alphabet and their therapeutic and magical virtues

• Examines the Forest Druid practices associated with each tree as well as the traditional uses in Native American medicine

• Describes the Celtic Fire Festivals and how each tree is featured in these holy days

• By the author of A Druid’s Herbal for the Sacred Earth Year

The Druids used the ancient Ogham Tree Alphabet to work magic and honor the dead, surrounding each letter with medicinal and spiritual lore. Poets and bards created a secret sign language to describe the letters, each of which is named for a tree or a plant. For centuries this language was transmitted only orally in order to protect its secrets.

Combining her extensive herbal knowledge and keen poetic insight, Ellen Evert Hopman delves deeply into the historic allusions and associations of each of the 20 letters of the Ogham Tree Alphabet. She also examines Native American healing methods for possible clues to the way ancient Europeans may have used these trees as healing agents. Druidic spiritual practices, herbal healing remedies, and plant lore are included for each tree in the alphabet as well as how each is used in traditional rituals such as the Celtic Fire Festivals and other celebrations. Hopman also includes a pronunciation guide for the oghams and information on the divinatory meanings associated with each tree.
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  • Destiny Books | 
  • 256 pages | 
  • ISBN 9781594772306 | 
  • June 2008
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Read an Excerpt

Hazel ◆ Coll

Hazel was an important tree-fruit in ancient Ireland. The Irish countryside was once covered with Hazel (Corylus avellana), an important source of carbohydrates and protein. The nuts could be stored for up to a year, making them a critical Winter food source, and they were widely traded.
The Hazel was classified as Airig Fedo, one of the “nobles of the wood” in the Bretha Comaithchesa, the main law text on farming. It was a valuable tree due to its nuts and the strong and pliable rods that could be taken from it to be used for fences and house walls (wattling). One cartload of rods a... see more

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