New from Simon & Schuster

Behind the Book

When people talk to me about what I do, they often ask “Which comes first, the writing or the drawing?” But the truth is, it isn’t normally that clear. Each book starts differently, with a muddle of drawing and text, which I think if you are both writing and illustrating is a good thing.

Picture books are special because to make them work well, they rely on both the images and the text to tell the story. One doesn’t make sense without the other, which is fantastic because it relies on the reader’s imagination to interpret what is going on.

When I came to make The Odd Egg, I didn’t have a story in my head at all, just a character. A duck.

I love ducks. There’s something so comical about them. I love the way they waddle, the way they quack, and that their beaks feel just like plastic (if you’re lucky enough to get that close!). 

I spent a long time drawing my duck in different situations before I decided that my book was going to be about a duck who felt left out because he was the only bird who hadn’t laid an egg. 

I had an image in my mind of a row of different sized eggs, and thought it would be fun if the child could actually “hatch” each of the eggs themselves.  

It was a fun book to draw. It looks deceptively simple, but it was very difficult to get all the split pages to line up! 

In the end all of the eggs hatch—but you’ll have to read it to see if Duck gets his much-longed-for baby!
From the Desk Of . . . Emily Gravett

 

When people talk to me about what I do, they often ask “Which comes first, the writing or the drawing?” But the truth is, it isn’t normally that clear. Each book starts differently, with a muddle of drawing and text, which I think if you are both writing and illustrating is a good thing.

 

Picture books are special because to make them work well, they rely on both the images and the text to tell the story. One doesn’t make sense without the other, which is fantastic because it relies on the reader’s imagination to interpret what is going on.

 

When I came to make The Odd Egg, I didn’t have a story in my head at all, just a character. A duck.

 

I love ducks. There’s something so comical about them. I love the way they waddle, the way they quack, and that their beaks feel just like plastic (if you’re lucky enough to get that close!).

 

I spent a long time drawing my duck in different situations before I decided that my book was going to be about a duck who felt left out because he was the only bird who hadn’t laid an egg.

 

I had an image in my mind of a row of different sized eggs, and thought it would be fun if the child could actually “hatch” each of the eggs themselves. 

 

It was a fun book to draw. It looks deceptively simple, but it was very difficult to get all the split pages to line up!

 

In the end all of the eggs hatch—but you’ll have to read it to see if Duck gets his much-longed-for baby!

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