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Lucky Baby

Lucky Baby

A Novel

  • reading group guide
Meg Lindsay has everything a woman could want except happiness. Can an adopted Chinese child bring her what she lacks?

All her life, Meg Lindsay’s mother told her what a disappointment she was. Try as she might, Meg never measured up, and the emotional bruises still hurt as an adult. In Meg’s opinion, no one could be a worse mother than the woman who gave birth to her—that is, until Meg has a child of her own to care for.

Two young girls lived in an orphanage in China. Unwanted because of a deformity and the lack of family registry, Little Zhen An was destined to spend her childhood in the orphanage. Her only friend was a slightly older blind girl, Wen Ming.

After Meg and her husband, Lewis, adopt one of the girls, Meg’s love for her new daughter grows daily, but the tension, fear, and uncertainty of motherhood drive Meg to the brink of despair. Fearing that she is becoming the kind of mother she hates, she fights circumstance, rebellion, a loving but at times tense marriage, setbacks, and the native selfishness that lives in all of us.

Meg’s journey is a magical one as East meets West and as imagination aligns with reality. Lucky Baby spans the world, bridges the gap between heart and soul, and shows that the greatest power on Earth is forgiveness.
Choose a format:
  • Howard Books | 
  • 320 pages | 
  • ISBN 9781416595502 | 
  • April 2010
List Price $13.99
This title is temporarily out of stock, please check back soon.

Read an Excerpt

PROLOGUE

Wen Ming, April 2001

The woman of my earliest memory has no body. Just a round face with skin like a plum. Smooth and tight. Firm. A smiling plum with dimples. She is not my mama. I don’t remember my mama.

Many years later, now that I am nearly grown, there are other things I remember. They are only pieces, like torn bits of a blurred photo. Sometimes I don’t know what is real memory and what my mind has filled in for me, but I think most of our lives happen in our minds, so it doesn’t bother me.

I remember a misty rain that smelled like the ocean and dead earthworms;... see more
ONE

Meg Lindsay

I watch her sleep. The turbulent energy of day has given way to the Elysian simplicity of night. I brush her pink lips with my thumb and her still-childish cheeks with my fingers. Her skin is the softness of every gentle memory and warm sensation I have ever known. It’s all there, in touching her. She will never know how many nights I’ve done this—stolen into her room to watch her—hungrily, desperately trying to fill the hole inside myself with her. I can’t love enough, can’t want enough, can’t get enough of her. The little hands; the messy, sweaty hair; the... see more

Reading Group Guide

This reading group guide for Lucky Baby includes an discussion questions, a Q&A with author Meredith Efken, websites for more information, and a special note from Meredith to book groups. The suggested questions are intended to help your reading group find new and interesting angles and topics for your discussion. We hope that these ideas will enrich your conversation and increase your enjoyment of the book.


Discussion Questions


Themes:


1) There are several different mother-figures in this story. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each one and the effect they had on their children. How did each character show a different facet of motherhood? (Hint: Look for a few characters who have mother attributes even if they aren’t actual mothers.)

2) In what ways were each of the four main characters (Meg, Lewis, Wen Ming, and Eva) abandoned by their parents? How did this affect them personally? How do you think this contributed to their struggles in becoming a family? Were there other instances of abandonment in the story? How did these events affect the characters?

3) Each section of the story is prefaced by a quote from Mother Theresa, who dedicated her life to serving orphans in India. Discuss the first two quotes: How does these pertain to that part of the story? How did the characters typify the idea in each quote? What does these quotes mean to you? How do you see the truth of see more

About the Author

Meredith Efken
Photograph © Cherie Phelps

Meredith Efken

Meredith has written three previous novels, SAHM I Am, Play it Again SAHM, and @Home for the Holidays. A stay-at-home mom with jobs including homeschooling her two daughters, writing, speaking, and freelance editing, Meredith has a background in adult education and has given workshops on writing, adoption, and church leadership topics. She is a member of several Chinese adoption communities, both online and in person, and speaks to women's groups like MOPS. She is a graduate of the Vineyard Leadership Institute. She is active at her church and enjoys spending time with her husband and two daughters, the oldest being adopted from China.

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