Return to main page for:

The Perfect Wife

The Life and Choices of Laura Bush
By Ann Gerhart

Reading Group Guide

    Reading Group Guide for The Perfect Wife
    1. What did the title of this book, The Perfect Wife, lead you to think about this biography? Before reading the book did you presume that the author had a particular opinion of Laura Bush? What do you think of the author's opinion now? What kind of woman would you consider a "perfect wife"? Which of Laura's characteristics do you believe the author wanted to call attention to with that description?
    2. The biography begins with the tragic death of Laura's classmate. Why do you think the author chose to start at that point in Laura's life? How might the accident have affected the demeanor Laura adopted in later years and the choices she made in her life?
    3. The town Laura grew up in, Midland, Texas, of the 1960s, was a deeply segregated community. There were limited opportunities for minorities and for women. How do you think that environment affected Laura Bush? Think about the schools she chose to teach in as well as her choice of career. Also, how do you think her childhood impressions of marriage and the roles of women affect her relationship with George as her husband and as President? To what extent do you believe she adopted the attitudes modeled for her in her childhood, and to what extent has she charted a new course for herself?
    4. The author notes that Laura gave up her teaching career when she married George. She also quotes Margaret LaMontagne Spellings, Bush's domestic policy adviser, who offered this observation: "Mrs. Bush discovered the power of her office allowed her to do good and fulfill some of her career goals" (125). What do you think Laura's career goals were? How do you think she balanced the choices that so many women have to make between having a family and having a career?
    5. There are many advantages to being First Lady, and many handicaps as well. What opportunities did the role open up for Laura? Where do you think she found personal satisfaction in her husband's first-term? On the other hand, what aspects of her being First Lady might prevent her from doing all she might wish? How do her image (and the image of the President), political necessities, and the expectations of the American public all affect the projects she undertakes and the way she exercises her influence?
    6. Similarly, do you think Laura inhabits the role of First Lady comfortably? Could she, if she chose, take greater advantage of her position? Or is she hampered by its conflicting demands? Ideally, what do think the role of the First Lady should be? How do you think her experience compares to that of other First Ladies?
    7. The Perfect Wife is a biography of Laura Bush, however, the author gives us fleeting glimpses of President Bush as well. Do you think the sparse information about George is enough to show his impact on her life? In other words, is it possible to study Laura without studying George? How much of an effect do they have on each other?
    8. Throughout this biography Laura is described as a talented homemaker. She can literally make a "home" out of a house in one weekend. Think about the homes she's lived in, from the house on Humble Avenue to her first house with George to the Crawford ranch and the White House. How do each of these places, particularly the ranch, reflect her character?
    9. The author says of Laura as First Lady, "She is stubbornly protective of the small zone of privacy afforded her in this country's most visible role for a woman" (xi). What parts of herself and her family does Laura guard, and why?
    10. Laura has been protective of her twin daughters ever since her troubled pregnancy. The author describes her as doting, even permissive, mother. How did you react to Laura's style of mothering? Do you think the decisions she has made regarding Barbara and Jenna reflect her own character?
    11. How successfully do you think the author penetrated the more personal aspects of Laura's life? What techniques does she use to shed light on matters Laura does not discuss? Do her insights seem on the mark, or far-fetched?
    12. Reading the biography, did you get the impression that the author had a political agenda? Did you notice any obvious bias or prejudice, or was her work an objective account of Laura's life so far?

Explore

CONNECT WITH US

Get a FREE eBook
when you join our mailing list!